Online Bookstore that specializes in selling rare titles

Update

Monday, September 21, 2020

Zerzura: The Legendary Oasis


A fertile area was often having a date palm tree formed by an underground aquifer or river that creates enough for water to seep to the surface, forming beautiful heaven in the desert, oasis

For many years, explorers have been fascinated by searching and discovering ancient lost cities, unraveling the mystery covering the treasures in some famous story of missing civilization. There are times that they are fruitful.

Image: couldthatbetrue

Some remained undiscovered; some were found beneath the ocean's depths, in an untouched forest, or lying in the vast desert, like the legendary oasis of Zerzura.

The mythical lost ancient oasis veiled in the Sahara Desert was long said to have existed deep in the desert west of the Nile River in Egypt or Libya. 



A book believed to be written in the 15th century, Kitab al Kanuz (Book of Hidden Treasures) was the treasure seekers' guide, who mentioned a city described as "white as a dove," which they called "The Oasis of Little Birds." A lost city in the Sahara full of riches with a sleeping king and queen, guarded by black giants who keep anyone from getting and going out. The black giants may have referred to the Tebu People inhibiting in Chad (North-central Africa bordered by Libya to the north and Sudan to the east). Libya is known as whose descendants used to raid oasis in Sahara.

Being the first European record to Zerzura, an account entitled "Topography of Thebes and a General View of Egypt" by English Egyptologist John Gardner Wilkinson in 1835. Wilkinson based his claim on a report by an Arab who said he had found the oasis while searching for a lost camel. Thriven in palms, and springs, and some relics of ambiguous dates, the oasis was called Wadee Zerzoora. Tales of secret desert sites found by researchers for stray camels were familiar; Wilkinson's claim was supported when explorers found some mysterious oasis named in his story along with Zerzura. But Zerzura was never found. 

Image: Ancient Pages

Tracing the fabled oasis' location was a challenge. Ralph Bagnold led the most recent expedition searching for the legendary oasis, an English 20th century explorer, geologist, and a soldier, along with Hungarian aristocrat László (Ladislaus) Almásy from 1929-1930. In 1932, Almásy-Patrick Clayton's (British surveyor and soldier) investigation discovered two valleys in the Gilf Kiber (southwest of Egypt and southeast of Libya) and found the 3rd Zerzura wadis, a rain oasis in the remote desert. Yet no exact location of Zerzura has been discovered. 


In 484-425 B.C., a Greek Historian Herodotus mentioned the legendary oasis known as "The City of Dionysus" that was lost in the desert sand, which could be the location of Zerzura.

Like many other lost cities or land, no one has successfully proven the stunning oasis of Zerzura. It may be possible that Zerzura is older than we think. The Sahara Desert was believed to be covered in the grass a long time ago. Scientists have discovered ancient rivers be present 100,000 years ago, which shaped green strips across Sahara.

Did it exist, or was it just one legend who may give us hope that the world is worth living with its secret places that can be lived peacefully?

"Take with your hand the key in the beak of the bird, then open the door of the city. Enter, and there you will find great riches..."-Kitab al Kanuz (Book of Hidden Treasures). 

Image: Ancient Pages

Did it exist, or was it just one legend who may give us hope that the world is worth living with its secret places that can be lived peacefully?

"Take with your hand the key in the beak of the bird, then open the door of the city. Enter, and there you will find great riches..."-Kitab al Kanuz (Book of Hidden Treasures).

Written by Kris De Vera Estrella, IFY Books

No comments:

Post a Comment